Published on 30 Dec 2014 Sections , , , , , , , , ,

How 2014 unfolded – in tweets

In Britain, 2014 was the year of the floods, Ukraine saw a revolution, Scotland almost went indy and the deadly Ebola struck west Africa.

In Britain, 2014 was the year of the floods, Ukraine saw a revolution, Scotland almost went indy and the deadly Ebola struck west Africa.

This is how our year unfolded in tweets.

— Jon Snow (@jonsnowC4) February 10, 2014

Jon Snow takes a boat into the heart of the Thames flooding crisis, to meet people whose homes and businesses are submerged.

The air is filled with the cacophony of revolution. Stun grenades, the ping of rubber bullets and the relentless drumming of any piece of metal that makes a noise. Matt Frei from Ukraine.

Nine months after flight MH370 vanished mid-air as it flew 239 people from Malaysia to China, its whereabouts – and what happened – remains a mystery.

A tragic accident was always going to happen under the inflamed circumstances in this neighbourhood, writes. But who could have imagined an accident like this against this ill-fated airline on such a scale? Matt Frei on the scene of the tragic MH17.

Months after being asked to do so, Lib Dem peer Lord Rennard formally apologises to the four women who accused him of inappropriate behaviour, writes Cathy Newman.

Many residents in Gaza are running out of food and water, with no electricity. Efforts to broker a humanitarian ceasefire which would allow people out to find supplies have come to nothing, writes Jonathan Miller from Gaza.

Driving to Aleppo, the Springsteen song My City of Ruins began to play in my head. But Aleppo is nowhere near rising up – and it may yet have further to fall, Lindsey Hilsum from Aleppo.

Tens of thousands of Yazidis flee for their lives from Islamic State fighters through the northern Iraqi desert. Jonathan Rugman reports from Iraq.

There are a panoply of risks associated to Scottish Independence. The transition risks might be survivable, but goodwill is required from London and Edinburgh if it is going to work, writes Paul Mason.

In some neighbourhoods on the outskirts of Freetown, Ebola orphans are left to fend for themselves while ambulances can’t respond to Ebola calls, Tom Clarke and Alex Thomson report from Sierra Leone.

The main protest site in Hong Kong occupies a large inner-city motorway as well as side streets, bridges and squares and it has been turned into an open-air art gallery, writes John Sparks.