Published on 22 Mar 2013

Heavy snow and blizzards – live blog

6.55pm

Just five minutes until the programme is on air. I’m just getting ready to head to the studio for my live chat at around 7.10pm. The ear piece will let me hear the gallery so I know how long I have left to talk. The clicker enables me to control my graphics.

 

6.30pm

Snow is showing signs of intensifying again across central and northern parts of the UK at the moment. Overnight, an additional 10-20cm of snow is possible – especially over the hills and mountains.

The strong to gale force wind will continue to cause the snow to drift and give poor visibility. Numerous weather warnings have been issued and the latest forecast is available on the Channel 4 Weather website.

 

5.45pm

Northern Ireland Electricity still has 48,000 customers without power this evening.

5.20pm Carol Lincoln has tweeted this picture of the snow lying on the ground outside Belfast airport this afternoon.

4.45pm Mal Jones has tweeted this picture from Telford, Shropshire of the snow falling outside.

4.20pm The latest update of weather information makes more of the snow across central southern and south east England tomorrow. Whilst still uncertain, there could be 2-5cm by the end of Saturday, with some places seeing as much as 10-15cm. 4.00pm Northern Ireland Electricity has drafted in emergency crews from ESB in neighbouring Ireland to help fix power supplies.

3.45pm A wintry scene from Four Crosses, Llanymynech this afternoon.

3.20pm I’m just making some graphics for a  studio chat that I’ll be doing on the wintry weather for tonight’s programme. 2.55pm It’s just been announced that Northern Ireland’s World Cup qualifier against Russia, that was due to take place tonight, is postponed until 3pm on Saturday because of snow rendering conditions unplayable at Windsor Park. 2.35pm The heaviest snow is currently across Cumbria, south west Scotland and eastern parts of Northern Ireland. As well as the snow, a strong to gale force easterly wind is blowing – drifting the snow around. Here’s a selection of wind gusts that were recorded at 2pm; Ronaldsway (Isle of Man) – 58mph Belfast – 48mph Boulmer – 46mph Bridlington – 44mph Glasgow -39mph   2.14pm Northern Ireland Electricity has tweeted that 40,000 homes are still without power. Repair crews are facing challenging conditions there as heavy sleet and snow continues to fall, with winds gusting widely 40-50mph.

 

1.55pm

I’ve just done a video forecast that takes a look at the weather for the rest of today and overnight. Further snow, ice and disruption is likely – mainly for central and northern parts of the UK.

 

1.15pm

As I predicted a few days ago, a large swathe of the UK has woken up to a blanket of snow as winter continues have us firmly in its icy grip.

The north Midlands, north Wales, northern England, south west Scotland and Northern Ireland have been worst affected with travel disruption, schools closed and around 40,000 homes left without power.

Throughout the day, I’ll be bringing you regular snow updates on this blog, with the latest on where the worst of the weather is, the effects it’s having and what is likely in the coming hours.

Picture: Shareen Hannum, Huddersfield

If you have any reports or pictures, then please get in touch on Twitter – @liamdutton. Don’t forget to include your name, location and the time at which any pictures (landscape orientation preferred) were taken.

Article topics

, , , ,

Tweets by @liamdutton

5 reader comments

  1. Andrew Dundas says:

    When the Russians leave Windsor Park (NI) will they please take THEIR snow back with them!

  2. Bill says:

    Hi Liam,
    Just saw your interview with KN about why the weather is as it is.
    Your explanation concerning the position of the jet-stream is ok, as far as it goes.
    But what influences cause the jet-stream to alter it’s position?
    This seems to me to be the more fundamental question.
    Thanks
    Bill

    1. Liam Dutton says:

      Hi Bill,

      The jet stream is driven by temperature contrasts between the poles and equator, steered from west to east by the spinning of the earth (coriolis effect). As temperature contrasts change through the year as we move from season to season, its average position shifts generally northwards in summer and southwards in winter.

      However, as well as this natural variability, there are other climatic factors that can influence its position – El Nino etc. There are also reasonable theories to suggest that a warming Arctic affects the jet stream, causing it to weaken and wave around more, getting stuck in the same place for a long time – giving more extremes.

      The above aside, there is still a lot that’s not fully understood, with lots of research being done.

      Hope this answers your question.
      Liam

  3. Robert Sully says:

    Its quite mild in Cornwall, weather totally normal in the Truro area.

  4. Andrew Dundas says:

    Above average temperatures in Anchorage, Alaska right now. And maybe Vancouver too. Might those less cold spots be, in any way, connected with the southwards slippage of the jet stream on our side of the Arctic?

Comments are closed.