Published on 14 Sep 2013

Lib Dems – beards, bags and sweeties

Here in sunny Glasgow, Tim Farron’s just done a Presidential address. He said he’d been described as “Nick’s ambassador to Planet Beard.” In the usual polished and witty performance he found time to thank Nick Clegg for putting him in charge of next year’s doomed local election campaign. He also thanked members for staying on late to listen to a slot he may think was unsympathetically scheduled. Mr Farron is sounding more and more like someone who could win a future leadership election, even if the MPs’ vote went to a more Cleggite candidate (at this stage, most widely seen as Ed Davey). But that’s not a contest that is imminent.

Last year the central message for Nick Clegg to deliver at his conference was that the coalition was for the full 5 years. The subliminal message was that Nick Clegg wasn’t just for Christmas, he was for the full 5 years too. This year, the message is all about trying to get the credit for what the Lib Dems have done in government.

Their imported South African strategist, Ryan Coetzee, talks about the Lib Dems’ electoral “market” being the 25% of voters who say they will or might vote Lib Dem. Their polling suggests that when the undecided segment of this “market” hears about what the Lib Dems have done in coalition, they like what they hear. But they have to hear what the Lib Dems are stopping the Tories doing in office, not just what they are getting implemented from their own plans.

So Nick Clegg, who used to forbid talk of the inner workings of the coalition, now advertises them – he’ll do more of that in his rally speech tonight. At the Liverpool conference in 2010, Nick Clegg proclaimed that the coalition partners together were better than either of their parties apart – many here in Glasgow never liked that and the “lifting the veil (on coalition disagreements)” strategy as it’s called by the leadership can’t come fast enough. There have been in recent months some pretty brittle clashes within the coalition: nursery ratios and the Lords ambushes over Levenson to name but two. The leadership has decided the course of such clashes prove that the coalition can withstand divisions like that.

Nick Clegg’s had to re-think some of his grid here. He’d hoped to announce the plastic bag tax tomorrow on Andrew Marr’s programme but the plastic bag dropped out into the street on the front of the Daily Mail today and has been littering other newspapers and websites all day. So Nick Clegg did his nature reserve photo op today and will have to think of something else to unveil tomorrow.

The Liberal Democrats Hold Their Annual Party Conference

The coalition partners tend to divvy up about 10 “sweeties” or conference policy announcements each at this team of year. Danny Alexander’s tax avoidance measures announcements have become something of a fixed part of the conference calendar in recent years. I’m told many party members travel to conference just to hear them in person.

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2 reader comments

  1. StuartM says:

    “This year, the message is all about trying to get the credit for what the Lib Dems have done in government”

    Like massive increases to student fees (despite pre election promises by the entire party) not to do so. Me thinks they need to be careful about pushing what they have done as much of their contribution is not great.

  2. Simon Bunce says:

    I saw you at Portcullis House on Thursday 12 Sep 13 while I was having a cup of coffee with my old school friend Sir Nicholas Harvey MP, former Min AF.
    I am minded to think “what would have happened if the Conservative Party had won an overall majority in May 2010.
    As a life long Tory supporter, and I was at the Brighton Conference in 1984 (and I won’t forget that one in a hurry!), I am still not sure an overall majority is such a good thing.
    First Past the Post gave us:
    1. The 3 day week.
    2. The miner’s strike.
    3. War x3.
    4. The North / South divide.
    5. Extraordinary Police powers against the common man (and woman).
    6. 11 Sep 01.
    7. The Korean War.
    8. The Vietnam War.
    9. France!

    Why don’t we try something different like “agreeing with eachother” or “agreeing to differ” but still not fighting. Or is too radical for modern day Britian?

    Kind Regards,
    Mr Simon C. Bunce

    PS. I know your colleague, Ms Katie Razzall.

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