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Tom Clarke

Science Editor
Science Editor Tom Clarke's beat varies from the pharmaceutical industry to climate change.
Science Editor Tom Clarke's beat varies from the pharmaceutical industry to climate change.

Since joining Channel 4 News in 2003, he has covered energy and the environment in from the Arctic Circle, seen some of the world's most endangered whales in Russia's far East, and followed the growing pains of the UK's landmark Climate Change Bill.

Tom started out as a scientist studying insects in the America’s deep south. After leaving the lab, Tom trained in journalism in New York. He worked as a science producer for American National Public Radio before returning to the UK to work for the science magazine Nature.

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article 21 October 2014 World, Sierra Leone
News
Adate, aged 10 - orphaned by Ebola, abandoned by neighbours

Adate, a young boy from Freetown, Sierra Leone, has lost his mother, his father and his sister to Ebola in the past week. Now neighbours shun him, fearing he also carries the virus.

video 20 October 2014 World, Sierra Leone

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Burying the Ebola dead in Sierra Leone - video

There is no panic: but the word 'Ebola' is everywhere - Channel 4 News Science Editor Tom Clarke reports from Sierra Leone in the heart of Ebola zone.

video 14 October 2014 World, Guinea

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Educating west Africa on spread of Ebola - video

Guinea President Alpha Condé tells Channel 4 News that people in west Africa do not understand why they cannot touch one another or bury their dead. "We are very tactile people."

post 10 October 2014
On the front line of Britain's response to Ebola

Porton Down is where blood samples from suspected UK Ebola cases are sent - and the lab staff are the busiest they've ever been.

video 10 October 2014

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Inside Porton Down Ebola laboratory - video

"This is where they handle live Ebola virus" - Channel 4 News Science Editor Tom Clarke visits a high-level virus containment lab at Porton Down.

post 07 October 2014
A sad entry into Ebola's history books

A Spanish nurse has tested positive for Ebola after helping treat a missionary doctor who was repatriated to Madrid last month.

post 01 October 2014
Are we heading for Ebola outbreak in the US?

The US is now dealing with the first case of Ebola to spread outside of Africa. As the size of the epidemic continues to grow exponentially there is a very high chance it won't be the last.

post 23 September 2014
What difference does a day make to climate change?

Today in New York the UN will sit down to talk about climate change. Again. But can one extra day of talking possibly make any difference to change the pace of action on global warming?

post 21 September 2014
Climate change: can the UN break the deadlock?

Organisers are expecting 100,000 people to take to the streets of Manhattan to call for global action on climate change. But will it translate to action in the corridors of the UN?

post 17 September 2014
UK volunteers step forward in the desperate battle against Ebola

With the spread of Ebola now out of control in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea a vaccine now being tested in the UK is probably the only hope for eventually stopping the outbreak.

post 11 September 2014
The terrifying mathematics of Ebola

Scientists estimate that the size of the Ebola epidemic in somewhere like Monrovia, the Liberian capital, could double in a fortnight.

video 09 September 2014 UK

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City buzz: bees swarm to the urban sprawl

It might be a concrete jungle, but bumblebees are quite content with a gritty urban lifestyle and not just rolling countryside, according to a new study. Science Editor Tom Clarke reports.

post 06 September 2014
Proton beams: better, but no magic bullet for all

Ashya King's parents made the headlines after going to extraordinary lengths to find treatment for him at the Proton Therapy Centre in Prague - but will it help Ashya?

post 06 September 2014
Brain tumours in children: symptoms and signs

Some child brain cancers grow very quickly so a diagnosis just a few weeks earlier can make a huge difference to a child's prospects.

article 05 September 2014 Science
Brain cancer
The worst place in Europe to have a brain tumour?

Cancer Research UK says survival for childhood cancers may have increased hugely in the UK and across Europe, but it masks the fact that some cancer types have not seen such a great improvement.

post 22 August 2014
Concerns over risks and benefits of stroke drug

A Lancet article says there are problems with clinical trial data for alteplase, a frontline medicine given to up to 20 per cent of those suffering strokes in England every year.

post 21 August 2014
Can eating fatty meat and whole milk help you lose weight?

Cheese, butter, clotted cream and a brick sized rib-eye steak. Delicious... but it's also all good for you - and can even help you lose weight. Complete fantasy? Not according to a new book.

post 20 August 2014
How long did neanderthals rub shoulders with our ancestors?

Neanderthals and humans definitely got together. Around 2 per cent of our genome is 'neanderthal' DNA.

post 19 August 2014
Bároarbunga: why air travellers needn't fear another 2010

Iceland's Bárðarbunga volcano looks like it's about to blow. But don't worry, say volcanologists, the eruption probably won't ruin anybody's travel plans - it's the wrong kind of ash.