A Royal Marine is convicted by a court martial board of murder following the execution of an injured Afghan insurgent in September 2011. Two other marines were acquitted.

Royal Marines murder court martial Afghanistan insurgent

Warning: the accompanying film contains footage that some may find disturbing

A Royal Marine was convicted of murder following the execution of an injured insurgent in Afghanistan.

A court martial board found the commando, known only as Marine A, guilty of murdering the man in Helmand province over two years ago.

Two other marines, known as Marines B and C, were acquitted.

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The marines denied murdering the unknown captured Afghan national on or about 15 September 2011, contrary to section 42 of the armed forces act 2006.

However, a seven-strong board consisting of officers and non-commissioned officers convicted one of the defendants following the two-week trial at the court martial centre in Bulford, Wiltshire.

Marines audio revealed: 'I just broke the Geneva Convention'

Marine A shot the man in the chest at close range with a 9mm pistol before quoting a phrase from Shakespeare as he died in front of him.

"There you are. Shuffle off this mortal coil, you ****. It's nothing you wouldn't do to us," Marine A is heard to state.

He then said: "Obviously this doesn't go anywhere, fellas. I just broke the Geneva Convention."

It is a matter of profound regret in this isolated incident that one marine failed to apply his training
Brigadier Bill Dunham

The execution was filmed by a camera mounted on the helmet of Marine B. Marines B and C were alleged to have been "party to the killing" and "encouraged and assisted" Marine A but they were cleared.

Marine A will be sentenced at Bulford on December 6.

Brigadier Bill Dunham, Deputy Commandant General Royal Marines, said the murder was "truly shocking and appalling".

"The Naval Service respects the verdict, which was reached in full accordance with UK law - to which all Service personnel are subject, and in the name of which many thousands of Royal Marines have fought the Taliban in Afghanistan since 2001.

"The Naval Service takes seriously its responsibilities to train its sailors and marines in the standards of conduct applicable to combat operations on land, at sea and in the air. It is a matter of profound regret in this isolated incident that one marine failed to apply his training and discharge his responsibilities.

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