Investigators searching for Malaysia Airline's flight MH370 say they have "no corroboration yet" that two objects spotted in the Indian Ocean have come from the missing plane.

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On Thursday, the world's best survey ships and observation planes flocked to a remote location in the southern Indian Ocean, 1,500 miles from Perth, after satellite images revealed two objects.

The discovery of the objects, one which was 24 metres long, was hailed as a "potential breakthrough" and a "positive development" in the hunt for the commercial jet, which has been missing, with 239 people on board, for almost two weeks.

However, Malaysia's acting transport minister said that no further development had been made.

"I have been getting reports all morning. There is no positive corroboration yet," Hishammuddin Hussein said.

"As I announced yesterday, there's so many vessels and aircraft heading in that direction. As we speak now, at the moment, we've not found anything concrete as yet."

An Australian government image showing the current search area

On Friday, India sent two aircraft from the Andamans to join the Indian Ocean search.

Above: an Australian government image showing the current search area.

Three Australian P3 Orions joined by a high-tech US Navy P8 Poseidon aircraft and a civilian Bombardier Global Express jet are already searching the 8,900 square mile zone.

A Norwegian merchant ship that had been diverted to the area on Thursday was still searching and the UK is sending HMS Echo to the area.

Meanwhile, investigators are still poring over satellite imagery in a bid to find more clues about the missing flight.

A press conference on the missing flight will be held at 9:30am, and will be live-streamed on this page.