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The Mill TX: 18 Aug 2013, Week 33

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Episode 4/4, Sunday 18th August, 8pm, Channel 4

In episode four of The Mill - the historical four-part drama written by John Fay set in rural-industrial England - Lucy (Katherine Rose Morley) and Esther (Kerrie Hayes) are convinced that Mr Timperley (Kevin McNally) is responsible for Catherine’s (Kaitlyn Hogg) disappearance and are determined to expose him but are blocked at every turn. Meanwhile, unbeknown to Esther, her sister Martha (Vicky Binns) has found one of the notes she left when she escaped to Liverpool and travels to Quarry Bank Mill in the hope of finding her. When Martha meets Hannah Greg (Barbara Marten) and Timperley, she is prevented from seeing her sister Esther but little Tommy (Connor Dempsey) witnesses everything.

Robert (Jamie Draven) arrives back at the Mill bearing the news that parliament has not passed the Ten Hour Bill, meaning children will continue to work 12-hour days. Much to Hannah Greg’s delight, The 1833 Slavery Abolition Act is passed banning slavery throughout the British Empire.

Becoming desperate, Esther seeks out patriarch Samuel Greg (Donald Sumpter) to tell him about Catherine’s shocking disappearance and death. Samuel, shamed and horrified, pledges his support but dies before he is able to intervene, leaving Robert the sole owner of the Mill.

To keep him on side with escalating political unrest, Robert offers Daniel (Mathew McNulty) a half-share in the patent of the new loom that he has completed but Daniel’s loyalty is tested when John Doherty (Aidan McArdle) arrives digging for more dirt on the Gregs.

Robert threatens that any worker attending Doherty’s union meeting will be sacked but Daniel, reaching breaking point, publicly announces his intention to attend. Taking no chances, Robert locks the apprentices away, but rallied by Esther and Lucy they all break free and march to Doherty’s meeting, led by a triumphant Esther. It’s a show of strength that directly challenges Robert’s authority and one that brings Esther face to face with her past.

The Mill is based inspired by the people and history of Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire and much of the drama was filmed in and around this National Trust property. This is Channel 4’s first factually-inspired period drama and is written by BAFTA award-winning John Fay (Clocking Off, Torchwood, Coronation Street), directed by James Hawes (Enid, The Suspicions of Mr Whitcher, Mad Dogs), and produced by Caroline Levy (George Gently, Excluded, Apparitions, Cape Wrath and Rough Justice).

Episode 3/4, Sunday 11th August, 8pm, Channel 4

In episode three of The Mill - a historical four-part drama written by John Fay set in rural-industrial England in the turbulent year of 1833 - Esther (Kerrie Hayes) and Lucy (Katherine Rose Morley) escape to Liverpool, narrowly avoiding capture by Timperley (Kevin McNally). When they arrive, Esther heads straight to the poorhouse to collect Lucy’s sister Catherine (Kaitlin Hogg), only to discover that she never returned. Even worse, Lucy has disappeared.

At the Mill, political activist John Doherty’s (Aidan McArdle) pamphlet attacking Mill owners, the Gregs, has made its way into Daniel’s (Matthew McNulty) hands. Encouraged by Susannah (Holly Lucas), with whom he is becoming close, Daniel shares it with the apprentices, revealing some of his more radical beliefs. Robert Greg (Jamie Draven) is becoming increasingly concerned by the threat that trade unionism poses to the family business.

Back in Liverpool, Esther visits a church whose records she hopes will help lead her to her family but she is betrayed and soon ends up in the clutches of Timperley once more. On arrival at Quarry Bank Mill, terrible news awaits him about his wife, Mrs Timperley (Claire Rushbrook). Beside himself, he blames Lucy and Esther, and wreaks especially cruel punishment on Esther.

When the identity of the father of Susannah Catterall’s (Holly Lucas) child is revealed as uncomfortably close to home, Robert arranges to move pregnant Susannah to another mill owned by the Gregs. Susannah is devastated at the prospect of being separated from her two siblings. Seeing this, Daniel makes an impulsive offer so that she can remain at the Mill.

Based on the extensive historical archive of Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire, The Mill depicts Britain at a time when the industrial revolution is changing the country beyond recognition. In the 1830s, children as young as nine work 12-hour shifts in the mills, and the new class of mill-owning families prosper. But the so-called “white slaves of England” are about to take their lives into their own hands for the first time as outsiders with new ideas enter their world.

The Mill is based inspired by the people and history of Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire and much of the drama was filmed in and around this National Trust property. This is Channel 4’s first factually-inspired period drama and is written by BAFTA award-winning John Fay (Clocking Off, Torchwood, Coronation Street), directed by James Hawes (Enid, The Suspicions of Mr Whitcher, Mad Dogs), and produced by Caroline Levy (George Gently, Excluded, Apparitions, Cape Wrath and Rough Justice).

The real Greg family was one of the leading industrial families of the period, with five mills employing thousands of workers. Liberal and politically active, they also helped found The Manchester Guardian and Britain's first stock exchange. They were a family full of contradictions: proud of their philanthropic reputation while owning a slave plantation in the Caribbean, and keeping the apprentice system longer than other mill owners

Episode 2/4, Sunday 4th August, 8pm, Channel 4

In episode two of The Mill - a historical four-part drama written by John Fay set in rural-industrial England in the turbulent year of 1833 - Esther Price (Kerrie Hayes) arrives in Manchester for her court appearance for assaulting her overseer, Charlie Crout (Craig Parkinson). On the assumption that she will be found guilty, apprentice house manager, Mr Timperley (Kevin McNally) has been sent to the poorhouse in Liverpool to collect a replacement apprentice – returning with two sisters, Lucy (Katherine Rose Morley) and Catherine Garner (Kaitlyn Hogg). But things in the courtroom do not go as expected – Crout’s evidence has holes in it, he is a suspect witness. When Esther is let off with just a fine, Robert Greg (Jamie Draven) is forced to take her back to the mill. But Esther is too shocked to celebrate her victory because the court has recorded her age as 15, and she is sure she is 17. This means she will have to work as an unpaid apprentice for longer so she resolves to uncover the truth.

At Quarry Bank Mill, Lucy and her younger sister Catherine are examined by the doctor and it soon becomes clear that Catherine is too weak to work. Robert orders that she be returned to the poorhouse, and Catherine sets off with Timperley back to Liverpool, leaving Lucy behind. But Timperley has other plans.

Following the court appearance, Robert Greg turns on Charlie Crout, and in response, Crout discloses the identity of the father of Susannah Catterall’s (Holly Lucas) child. With the truth uncomfortably close to home, Robert buys her silence. Susannah begins to work alongside the charismatic young engineer Daniel Bate (Matthew McNulty) to help him develop a new loom but they do not get off to a good start.

Hannah Greg (Barbara Marten) attends an abolitionist meeting where the speaker, freed slave Mary Prince (Flo Wilson), outlines the shocking reality of slavery first-hand. Political campaigner, John Doherty (Aidan McArdle), who also attends, ridicules Hannah as a slave-owning hypocrite – the Greg family owns a plantation in Dominica. Humiliated, Hannah is spurred to confront her husband and son about their Caribbean plantation.

Lucy, desperate to be reunited with her sister, hatches a plan to run away to Liverpool. Esther is determined to prove her real age as 17, releasing her from two extra years of bonded slavery, and believes the answer lies in the city of her birth, Liverpool. The girls form a grudging alliance, and resolve to escape together. But unbeknown to them, Lucy never made it to back to the poorhouse.

Based on the extensive historical archive of Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire, The Mill depicts Britain at a time when the industrial revolution is changing the country beyond recognition. In the 1830s, children as young as nine work 12-hour shifts in the mills, and the new class of mill-owning families prosper. But the so-called “white slaves of England” are about to take their lives into their own hands for the first time as outsiders with new ideas enter their world. At Quarry Bank Mill things are about to change.

The Mill is based on the people and history of Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire and much of the drama was filmed in and around this National Trust property. This is Channel 4’s first factually-inspired period drama and is written by BAFTA award-winning John Fay (Clocking Off, Torchwood, Coronation Street), directed by James Hawes (Enid, The Suspicions of Mr Whitcher, Mad Dogs), and produced by Caroline Levy (George Gently, Excluded, Apparitions, Cape Wrath and Rough Justice).

The real Greg family was one of the leading industrial families of the period, with five mills employing thousands of workers. Liberal and politically active, they also helped found The Manchester Guardian and Britain's first stock exchange.

Episode 1/4, Sunday 28th July, 8pm, Channel 4

The Mill is a historical four-part drama written by John Fay set in rural-industrial England in the turbulent year of 1833. Based on the extensive historical archive of Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire, this powerful new serial depicts Britain at a time when the industrial revolution is changing the country beyond recognition. In the 1830s, children as young as nine work 12-hour shifts in the mills, and the new class of mill-owning families prosper. But the so-called “white slaves of England” are about to take their lives into their own hands for the first time as outsiders with new ideas enter their world. At Quarry Bank Mill things are about to change.

A third of the workforce at Quarry Bank are apprentices – many are youngsters sold by local workhouses to the Gregs, the mill owners. These unpaid apprentices have no right to leave the mill until adulthood, bearing an uncomfortable similarity to the slaves who the Gregs also own in the Caribbean. In this bold new drama, the apprentices are led by Kerrie Hayes (Black Mirror, Good Cop, Kicks) as the real life Esther Price, a feisty Liverpudlian well documented in Quarry Bank's archives, who risks her own position to stand up for justice. The arrival of Daniel Bate, played by Matthew McNulty (Misfits, The Syndicate) – a progressive young engineer with a troubled past - proves a catalyst, and the political firebrand John Doherty, played by Aidan McArdle (The Duchess, Garrow’s Law), seems to offer the workers the possibility of a new and better future.

The adults who rule these teenagers’ lives with an iron rod include Kevin McNally (Pirates of the Caribbean, Downton Abbey) as Mr Timperley, Manager of the Apprentice House, and Claire Rushbrook (Secrets and Lies, My Mad Fat Diary) as his wife. Craig Parkinson plays Charlie Crout; an abusive overseer whose treatment of Miriam (Sacha Parkinson), a young apprentice, compels the outspoken Esther Price to speak out while Miriam’s more compliant sister, Susannah (Holly Lucas) tries to keep her head down.

Donald Sumpter (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Game of Thrones) and Jamie Draven (Billy Elliott) play Quarry Bank’s founder Samuel Greg and his ambitious son Robert, while Barbara Marten (Casualty, Waking the Dead) plays Hannah Greg, Robert's mother, who wants to improve the apprentices' lives while defending the family business.

The real Greg family was one of the leading industrial families of the period, with five mills employing thousands of workers. Liberal and politically active, they also helped found The Manchester Guardian and Britain's first stock exchange. They were a family full of contradictions: proud of their philanthropic reputation while owning a slave plantation in the West Indian island of Dominica, and holding on to the apprentice system far longer than other mill owners.

The Mill is based on the people and history of Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire and much of the drama was filmed in and around this National Trust property. This is Channel 4’s first factually-inspired period drama and is written by BAFTA award-winning John Fay (Clocking Off, Torchwood, Coronation Street), directed by James Hawes (Enid, The Suspicions of Mr Whitcher, Mad Dogs) and produced by Caroline Levy (George Gently, Excluded, Apparitions, Cape Wrath and Rough Justice).

Commissioning editors: Julia Harrington (Factual) and Sophie Gardiner (Drama)

Production Company: DSP

Executive Producers at DSP: Julian Ware, Dominic Barlow

Creative Director at DSP: Emily Roe

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